July 3  2015, Friday
eMedinewS
editorial
Give anti-hypertensive drugs at night
Dr KK Aggarwal Anti-hypertensive drugs should be taken at night.

Uncontrolled blood pressure can lead to heart attacks, paralysis and heart failure. Most such attacks occur in the early morning hours. Pulse, blood pressure and thickening of platelets are all higher in the early morning hours.

Controlling early morning blood pressure can reduce cardiovascular mortality.

Among patients with chronic kidney disease and high blood pressure, taking at least one antihypertensive drug at bedtime significantly improves blood pressure control, with an associated decrease in risk for cardiovascular events, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

The study included 661 patients with chronic kidney disease who were randomly assigned either to take all prescribed anti BP drugs on awakening or to take at least one of them at bedtime. Patients were followed for a median of 5.4 years; during that time, patients who took at least one BP–lowering drug at bedtime had approximately one third of the cardiac risk compared with those who took all medications on awakening.

A similar significant reduction in cardiac deaths, heart attacks and paralysis was noted with bedtime dosing. Patients taking their medications at bedtime also had a significantly lower mean BP while sleeping.

For each 5 mmHg decrease in mean sleep–time systolic upper BP, there was a 14% reduction in the risk for cardiovascular events during follow–up.

Potential explanation for the benefit of night time treatment may be associated with the effect of night time treatment on urinary albumin excretion levels. Urinary albumin excretion is significantly reduced after bedtime, but not morning, treatment.
IMA,IJCP,HCFI
eMedipics IMA,IJCP,HCFI
IMA Rise & Shine CME in Dhanbad
IMA,IJCP,HCFI
TRENDO 2015
The 3rd Annual meeting of the Endocrine Society of Tamil Nadu and Puducherry will be held in Kodaikanal on 11th and 12th of July 2015. TRENDO 2015 is proposed to address latest updates, emerging concepts, clinical applications and controversies in diabetes, thyroid disorders, gonadal problems, pituitary disorders, metabolic bone disease and adrenal diseases.
News
  • Vitamin D supplementation increases the benefits of weight loss on systemic inflammation linked to cancer and chronic disease, suggests new research published online in Cancer Prevention Research.
  • Patients with polycythemia vera who continue treatment with ruxolitinib for up to 80 weeks seem to have durable hematocrit control and reductions in spleen volume, suggests new research presented at the 20th Congress of the European Hematology Association.
  • Among obese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus, bariatric surgery with 2 years of a low-level lifestyle intervention resulted in more disease remission as compared to lifestyle intervention alone, reported a study published online in JAMA Surgery.
  • The submucous plexus shows functional and structural changes in patients with functional dyspepsia, suggested duodenal biopsy findings published online in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.
  • A new study suggests that there may be a reciprocal, causal pathway between job strain and disturbed sleep, thus highlighting that interventions to treat sleep problems may improve work satisfaction. The findings are published in the July issue of the journal Sleep.
Cardiology eMedinewS
  • A strategy in which the implantable cardioverter defibrillator delivers a shock aimed at restoring sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation seems about as safe and effective as traditional external shocks in a small, single-center study. The findings were published in the Annals of Noninvasive Electrocardiology.
  • A new study recommends that people with cardiac devices such as pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators should be wary of smartphones, suggesting that close proximity to the phones can potentially disrupt functioning or cause painful shocks. The findings were presented at the joint meeting of the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and Cardiostim.
Pediatrics eMedinewS
  • Multiple antibiotic use in early childhood may lead to weight gain, increased bone growth and altered gut bacteria, reported a new study published in Nature Communications.
  • The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is investigating the safety of using codeine-containing medicines to treat coughs and colds in children younger than 18 years due to the potential for serious adverse effects, including slowed or difficult breathing. In a safety communication on July 1, the FDA said that children, especially those with existing breathing problems, may be more prone to these serious adverse effects.
Dr KK Spiritual Blog
Facts about Soul and the Spirit
  • Energy is the raw material of the universe.
  • Information is the organization of energy into reproducible patterns.
  • Consciousness is living information and energy (living energized information). Consciousness is, therefore, intelligence.
  • Intelligence is information and energy that has self–referral or the ability to learn through experiences and the ability to reinterpret and influence one’s own information and energy states.
  • Consciousness is live, advanced, software–driven energized information. Nearest example: Advanced computer software which can type, correct, interpret, edit and store spoken or read information.
Inspirational Story
The Obstacle in Our Path

In ancient times, a King had a boulder placed on a roadway. Then he hid himself and watched to see if anyone would remove the huge rock. Some of the king’s wealthiest merchants and courtiers came by and simply walked around it. Many loudly blamed the King for not keeping the roads clear, but none did anything about getting the stone out of the way.

Then a peasant came along carrying a load of vegetables. Upon approaching the boulder, the peasant laid down his burden and tried to move the stone to the side of the road. After much pushing and straining, he finally succeeded. After the peasant picked up his load of vegetables, he noticed a purse lying in the road where the boulder had been. The purse contained many gold coins and a note from the King indicating that the gold was for the person who removed the boulder from the roadway.

The peasant learned what many of us never understand! Every obstacle presents an opportunity to improve our condition.
Wellness Blog
Smell check, scratch and sniff, a new test for Parkinson’s disease

Olfactory dysfunction presenting as odor detection, discrimination and identification is a common finding in patients with early non vascular Parkinson’s disease.

As per a study of 2,267 men published in the Annals of Neurology, an impaired sense of smell could be an early indicator of Parkinson’s disease, occurring up to four years before motor skill problems appear.

In the study decreased odor identification was associated with older age, smoking, more coffee consumption, less frequent bowel movements, lower cognitive function and excessive daytime sleepiness, but even after adjusting for these factors, those with the lowest odor identification scores had a five time greater risk of developing Parkinson’s disease than those with the highest scores.

Nerve loss and the formation of Lewy bodies — abnormal clumps of proteins inside nerve cells that are thought to be a marker of the disease — are known to take place in the olfactory structures of patients with the disease.

An impaired sense of smell could also be caused by impaired sniffing, which may be another motor symptom of Parkinson’s.

Early indicators of Parkinson’s disease are olfactory abnormality, constipation and sleep disturbances.

Besides Parkinson’s disease, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, malnutrition, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis and Korsakoff’s psychosis are all accompanied or signaled by smell disorders.
Events
IMA,IJCP,HCFI
Make Sure
Situation: A patient of pulmonary Koch on ATT complained of numbness in fingers and toes.
Reaction: Oh my God! I forgot to prescribe vitamin B complex.
Lesson: Make sure that in patients talking ATT (including INH) B–complex vitamins (especially vitamin B6) are prescribed to prevent neuropathy. Addition of antioxidants and multivitamins also boost the immune system.
Dr Good Dr Bad
Situation: An adolescent came with pre pubertal gynecomastia of more than six months duration.
Dr Bad: This is normal.
Dr Good: This is persistent prepubertal gynecomastia.
Lesson: If the patient is an adolescent and has a normal general physical and genital examination, then it is quite likely that he has pubertal gynecomastia (seen in 25% cases). Re–evaluation at 6–monthly intervals will show whether the condition is persistent or not; improvement supports the initial impression of a pubertal cause.
(Copyright IJCP)
eMedi Quiz
Commonest cause of sporadic encephalitis is:

1. Japanese B virus
2. Herpes simplex virus.
3. Human immunodeficiency virus.
4. Rubeola virus.

Yesterday’s Mind Teaser: A 70-year-old male patient presented with history of chest pain and was diagnosed to have coronary artery disease. During routine evaluation, an ultrasound of the abdomen showed presence of gallbladder stones. There was no past history of biliary colic or jaundice. What is the best treatment advice for such a patient for his gallbladder stones?

1. Open cholecystectomy.
2. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
3. No surgery for gallbladder stones.
4. ERCP and removal of gallbladder stones.

Answer for yesterday’s Mind Teaser: 3. No surgery for gallbladder stones.
Correct Answers received from: Dr Jainendra Upadhyay, Dr Poonam Chablani, Dr Sushma Chawla, Dr K Raju, Dr Bitaan Sen & Dr Jayashree Sen, Daivadheenam Jella, Dr Pandit Hantodkar, Dr Pravin H Patel.
Answer for 1st July Mind Teaser: 1. G0-G1-S-G2-M.
Correct Answers received: Dr Jainendra Upadhyay, Dr Pravin H Patel, Dr Pandit Hantodkar.
eMedinewS Humor
A Large family

The mother of a large family was explaining why she dressed her children alike, right down to the youngest baby. "When we had just four children, I dressed them alike so we wouldn’t lose any of them." "Now," she added, looking around at her brood of nine, "I dress them alike so we won’t pick up any that don’t belong to us."
IMA,IJCP,HCFI
Rabies News (Dr A K Gupta)
Should modern rabies vaccines meant for use in man be given to animals?

It is advisable to use human vaccines for human use and use the veterinary vaccines for animals.
IJCP Book of Medical Records
IJCP’s ejournals
CPR 10
Total CPR since 1st November 2012 – 101090 trained
Video of the Day
Sameer Malik Heart Care Foundation Fund
The Sameer Malik Heart Care Foundation Fund is a one of its kind initiative by the Heart Care Foundation of India instituted in memory of Sameer Malik to ensure that no person dies of a heart disease because they cannot afford treatment. Any person can apply for the financial and technical assistance provided by the fund by calling on its helpline number or by filling the online form.
Madan Singh, SM Heart Care Foundation Fund, Post CAG
Kishan, SM Heart Care Foundation Fund, Post CHD Repair
Deepak, SM Heart Care Foundation Fund, CHD TOF
Press Release
Vegetables & fruits lower chances of getting some cancers

Vegetables and fruits help lower your chances of getting head, neck, breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers. Even one additional serving of vegetables or fruits could help lower the risk of head and neck cancer. The more fruits and vegetables you can consume, the better.

Quoting an International Study from National Cancer Institute, Padma Shri, Dr B C Roy National Awardee & DST National Science Communication Awardee, Dr K K Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India and Hony. Secretary General Indian Medical Association said that those who eat six servings of fruits and vegetables per 1,000 calories have a 29% decreased risk relative to those who have 1.5 servings. In the study, after adjusting the data to account for smoking and alcohol – known risk factors for head and neck cancer – the researchers found that those who consumed the most fruits and vegetables had the lowest risk for head and neck cancers.

Vegetables appeared to offer more cancer prevention than fruits alone did. Adding just one serving of fruit or vegetables per each 1000 calories consumed daily resulted in a 6% reduction of risk.

In another study, broccoli and soy protein were found to protect against the more aggressive breast and ovarian cancers. When consumed together, digesting broccoli and soy forms a compound called di–indolylmethane (DIM). In lab experiments, the researchers found that DIM could affect the motility of breast and ovarian cancer cells, which could help keep cancers from spreading. Soy, acts like estrogen and is a nutritious, healthy food, and should be eaten in moderation.

Yet another study compared intake of flavonols to their risk of pancreatic cancer. Flavonols are protective compounds found in fruits and vegetables, such as onions, apples, berries, kale and broccoli. Those who had the highest consumption of flavonols reduced their risk of pancreatic cancer by 23%. The benefit was even greater for people who smoked. Smokers with high levels of flavonols reduced their risk of pancreatic cancer by 59%.
eIMA News
News
  • The prevalence of occult cancer was low among patients with a first unprovoked venous thromboembolism. Routine screening with CT of the abdomen and pelvis did not provide a clinically significant benefit. (N Engl J Med. 2015 Jun 22)
  • Close to 400,000 cardiac arrests occur outside of hospitals each year in the US, and only about one in 20 people who suffer cardiac arrest events survive, according to a report from the Institute of Medicine.
  • Jabalpur: As the chorus for CBI probe into the alleged unnatural deaths of MPPEB (Madhya Pradesh Professional Examination Board) scam accused is growing louder, the local branch of Indian Medical Association today demanded probe by the central agency into the death of the dean of government medical college D K Sakalle. "Dr Sakalle was looking for 'Munna bhais' (those who passed by cheating, a la the Sanjay Dutt character in a Bollywood film) in his college, IMA district president Sudhir Tiwari said (Business Standard).
  • To mark Doctor's Day, the Indian Medical Association (IMA) Nagpur chapter felicitated Dr Kumud Thakkar, Dr V K Deshpande, Dr Vijay Tungar, Dr Prabha Bhattacharya, Dr Malhar Kawley, Dr Sanjay Jaiswal and Dr Sunanda Sule for their contribution to the profession. Dr Sunil Gupta, Dr Ashutosh Apte, Dr Pradeep Mishra and Dr Divakar Bhoyar were felicitated for their special achievements (TOI).
Doctors are the Best
(SUNDAY SENTIMENTS I Karan Thapar)

I am often asked what I consider the most respected of professions. It's not Just Idealistic school children who want to know but also adults and even, occasionally, journalists, But I’ve always ducked the issue. When pressed I pass on my late wife Nisha's, answer. "The medical Profession", she would say, she had no doubt about it. Her own, banking and mine. Journalism, were held in low regard!
Over the last six weeks I've realized Nisha was right. It’s when you need one that you understand how important a doctor is, and that's when you see how far they go to help and care.
I'm not sure what the limits of a doctor’s duty would be, but In the last forty five days not once did I see one, restrained by them.
Let me explain. On the 16th of June, Mummy broke her right hip. Two and a half years earlier she had broken the left one. At 91 this double whammy was a particularly debilitating and worrying blow. My sisters and I had premonitions of the worst. But the care and affection Mummy got at the Army's R &R Hospital eased our concerns. In your nineties life is precarious but the R and R has given her the gift of a second start. It’s also made me think how I should answer that question.
In Nisha's eyes what made doctors special was their dedication to saving human life. No one else, she would argue can make a similar claim. And although she used the word doctor, it was a short form. The medical profession as a whole was what she had in mind – nurses, physiotherapists, interns. She saw them as a fraternity.

But let me go two steps further. I have the advantage of witnessing Mummy's hospital experience and before that, Nisha's long stint at the National Hospital in London. I would add there's something special about the people who choose to become doctors and nurses. They tend to be gentler, more caring, more sympathetic than the rest of us. Even relations can get frustrated by the tantrums or depression of the ill. They never are.

At the R & R, Mummy’s doctors would often visit late at night to see if she had eaten or was cheerful. On Sundays the Commandant’s wife would send her idlis and sambar to induce an appetite. The nurses would take turns coaxing her to eat or simply chat to pass the long night hours. And the patience, with which patients are washed, cleaned, massaged or, in Mummy's case, taught to walk is simply remarkable.

Of course, doctors and nurses all over the world are like this. But what makes those at the R&R special is that here they do It out of love and dedication. Out in civvy street, their colleagues are Likely to charge a king's ransom and you have no alternative but to At the PRY. Army Hospital remuneration is the last of their concerns. The salaries they receive do not reward their dedication. If anything, they mock it!

The paradox is that no sooner had I tome to this conclusion than I found most people readily accept the broad point. I’ve made about the medical profession. Whoever I shared my thoughts with seemed to immediately agree. But there is a flip side to this unanimity. It emerges from the fact that news of doctors going on strike - or mass casual leave - is always met with dismay. Such acts of protest seem to contradict the nobility of their profession. It’s seen as a self-Inflicted injury an act that places doctors and nurses on the same level as the rest of us, Doctors, we seem to believe, are special and therefore they must not resort to behavior unremarkable for the rest of us. Perhaps, but then isn't It incumbent on us to ensure they don't need to? Should they not be amongst the best paid? Should we not reward them for their devotion without their having to demand It?
I would say the answer is an unequivocal yes. This should be our way of saying thank you.
IMA celebrates Doctor’s Day
Tribune News Service: Jalandhar, July 1

On the occasion of Doctor’s Day, large-scale celebrations took place across all the state branches of the Indian Medical Association. A conference was also held in Jalandhar to celebrate the occasion.

Padma Shri Awardees and the National President and Honorary Secretary General of the Indian Medical Association, Dr. A Marthanda Pillai and Dr. KK Aggarwal in a joint statement, said, “Doctors in India have since the very onset been bestowed the status of God. However with the recent inclusion of medical services under the Consumer Protection Act, the integrity and trust in the doctor-patient relationship has been threatened.”

Voicing a unanimous plea, Dr SPS Sooch, State President and Dr. Navjot Singh Dahiya, Honorary State Secretary, IMA, Punjab, at an event held in the city, said, “IMA demands that the right to health be made a fundamental right. To achieve this goal, the government should strengthen the public healthcare delivery system and promote and support the private health sector which caters to 70 per cent of the healthcare demands of our country.”

In IMA Conference in which Dr. G. S. Gill (Past President), Dr. Rakesh Vig (Past President), Dr. Yogeshwar Sood, Dr. Rajeev Sood (President IMA Jalandhar Branch), Dr. JP Singh (Secretary IMA Jalandhar) were present.

The Indian Medical Association expressed its concern over the drastic increase in the cases of violence against doctors and medical establishments. It was discussed that the need of the hour was for the society to create an atmosphere where doctors can practice with peace and dignity. With the gradual increase in treatment costs, IMA also urged the government to roll out a realistic health policy aimed at the overall benefit of the Indian population and to increase the health allocation in the union budget to at least 2.5 percent of the GDP.

Another important concern raised was regarding common healthcare issues, which continue to plague our society such as a high maternal mortality and infant mortality rate and the inability of the government to stop the spread of communicable diseases (India fares lower than even Nepal, Bangladesh & Sri Lanka in this regard).

All 2.5 lakh members of the Indian Medical Association were asked to take a pledge re-instating their commitment towards the overall healthcare benefit of the nation and working while upholding the highest standards of ethics.

In parallel press events held across 30 IMA branches, senior doctors were honoured for their contribution in the field of medicine. Key principles that should govern the crucial doctor-patient relationship were also discussed. In addition to the doctors and their families, social organizations and the general public joined the celebrations. Blood donation camps were also organised in each State and awareness was raised about how each healthy individual must donate blood regularly. July 1st is observed as 'Doctors Day' every year n memory of Bharat Ratna Awardee late Dr. BC Roy who was the doyen of the medical profession.
Doctor's Day observed in State
Imphal, Jul 1: India Medical Association (IMA), Manipur State Branch, today organised the Doctor's Day 2015 at IMA Hall, Lamphelpat.

The observance function was graced by Dr O Ibomcha Singh, Director Health Services, Dr Ksh Kala Singh, President, IMA, Manipur State Branch and Dr P Nishikanta Singh, former president, IMA, Manipur State Branch as the chief guest, president and guest of honour respectively.

Speaking at the function, Dr Ibomcha said that co-operation between the medical staff and patients' family members will prevent any misunderstanding during treatment.

"However, an instance where a patient is being kept under medical observation unnecessarily in a hospital with the sole intention of gaining monetary benefits is very unfortunate. Authority concerned of every hospital should see to it that medical should be a selfless service", he added. As part of the observation, free medical treatments were organised in various places of the State today. An online press conference was also organised today by IMA at the Department of Telemedicine, RIMS.

The press conference was addressed by Dr A Marthanda Pillai, President, IMA and Dr KK Aggarwal, General secretary, IMA.
Doctors Day in India
Imphal Times: On the occasion of Doctors Day, large-scale celebrations took place across all the State branches of the Indian Medical Association.
July 1st is observed as ‘Doctors Day’ every year in memory of Bharat Ratna Awardee late Dr. BC Roy who was the doyen of the medical profession.
“Doctors in India have since the very onset been bestowed the status of God. However with the recent inclusion of medical services under the Consumer Protection Act, the integrity and trust in the doctor-patient relationship has been threatened”, said Padma Awardee Dr A Marthanda Pillai - National President and Padma Awardee Dr KK Aggarwal - Honorary Secretary General of the Indian Medical Association in a joint statement.

The Indian Medical Association expressed its concern over the drastic increase in the cases of violence against doctors and medical establishments. It was discussed that the need of the hour was for the society to create an atmosphere where doctors can practice with peace and dignity. This in turn would allow the medical fraternity to put its best foot forward towards providing the best possible healthcare services to the society at large without the fear of assault and harassment. The urgent need for a Central Act to protect doctors while on duty and medical establishments against public outrage was also voiced.

Another important concern raised was regarding common healthcare issues, which continue to plague our society such as a high maternal mortality and infant mortality rate and the inability of the government to stop the spread of communicable diseases (India fares lower than even Nepal, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka in this regard). With the gradual increase in treatment costs, IMA also urged the government to roll out a realistic health policy aimed at the overall benefit of the Indian population and to increase the health allocation in the union budget to at least 2.5% of the GDP.

Voicing a unanimous plea, Dr Ksh Kala Singh President and Dr Arunkumar Singh Ngangom Secretary General of the Manipur State IMA branch said, “IMA demands that the right to health be made a fundamental right. To achieve this goal, the government should strengthen the public healthcare delivery system and promote and support the private health sector which caters to 70% of the healthcare demands of our country”.

All 2.5 lakh members of the Indian Medical Association were asked to take a pledge re-instating their commitment towards the overall healthcare benefit of the nation and working while upholding the highest standards of ethics. While a doctor saves the lives of a majority of his patients, there are some cases, which are beyond his control. In such scenarios, the doctor must maintain an empathetic approach towards the family of the patient.

IMA directed doctors to follow several practices in public interest including devoting one hour in a week towards promoting the idea of Swachch Bharat - Swasth Bharat; providing medical concessions to the elderly; working towards eradicating any discrimination against girl children; offering special privileges to women delivering a girl child; providing free heart surgeries to girl children suffering from complex congenital heart disease and cannot otherwise afford the surgery cost; adopting villages under the IMA Aao Gaon Chalen initiative; starting adolescent clinics; starting meditation cells; and notifying every case of TB.
Indian Medical Association celebrates Doctor’s Day
Thisweekbangalore.com

Bengaluru, July 1, 2015: Karnataka branch of Indian Medical Association has celebrated Doctors Day in Bengaluru today.

The occasion marked blood donation camp and felicitation to senior doctors who served public. July 1st is observed as ‘Doctors Day’ every year in memory of Bharat Ratna Awardee late Dr. BC Roy who was the doyen of the medical profession.

Speaking on the occasion, Dr Honne Gowda, President of state Unit of IMA “IMA demands that the right to health be made a fundamental right. To achieve this goal, the government should strengthen the public healthcare delivery system and promote and support the private health sector which caters to 70% of the healthcare demands of our country.”

“Doctors in India have since the very onset been bestowed the status of God. However with the recent inclusion of medical services under the Consumer Protection Act, the integrity and trust in the doctor-patient relationship has been threatened“, he lamented.

Speakers expressed their concern over the drastic increase in the cases of violence against doctors and medical establishments. It was discussed that the need of the hour was for the society to create an atmosphere where doctors can practice with peace and dignity. This in turn would allow the medical fraternity to put its best foot forward towards providing the best possible healthcare services to the society at large without the fear of assault and harassment. The urgent need for a Central Act to protect doctors while on duty and medical establishments against public outrage was also voiced.
Supreme Court Orders Compensation of Rs. 1.8 Crore to Chennai Girl in Medical Negligence Case
All India | Reported by A Vaidyanathan, Edited by Anindita Sanyal | Updated: July 02, 2015 00:28 IST

New Delhi: The Supreme Court today ordered one of the largest compensations so far in the country in a case of medical negligence - Rs. 1.8 crore. The Tamil Nadu government has to pay the sum to a 18-year-old girl who lost her vision at birth due to medical negligence at a government-run hospital. The girl, who is now 18 years old, was born prematurely at the government hospital in Chennai's Egmore. But she was discharged from the hospital without a retinopathy test, a must for preemies.

By the time the family discovered the lapse, the girl had lost her vision. Her father then approached the National Consumer Forum, which awarded Rs. 5 lakh. Unhappy with the compensation, the family then approached the top court. The Tamil Nadu government, too, had challenged the order of the consumer forum.

Today, the court dismissed the state government's appeal and directed it to pay the higher compensation. "At last, justice has prevailed," the girl's father, Mr Krishna Kumar, told NDTV. "After 18 years of legal fight, it is a big relief. But the compensation can't match the sufferings still there."

The bench of Justices J S Khehar and S A Bobde ordered the state and other respondents to pay Rs 1.38 crore as compensation and Rs 42 lakh as reimbursement of medical expenses, taking the total award to Rs 1.80 crore.

The child was born 10 weeks prematurely to V Krishnakumar and his wife in August 1996 at the government hospital for women and children. But the neonatal expert and the paediatrician at the hospital never warned the parents that all babies born prematurely were prone to retinopathy of prematurity (RoP) and that if early preventive measures were not taken, it could result in blindness.

Krishna kumar filed a case under Consumer Protection Act in February 1998 before National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission in New Delhi seeking Rs 20 lakh towards airfare, medical expenses and stay in the US, Rs 30 lakh towards future treatment and Rs 50 lakh for pain, loss and mental agony.
IMA,IJCP,HCFI
Quote of the Day
Problems are only opportunities in work clothes. Henry J. Kaiser
IMA in Social Media
https://www.facebook.com/ima.national 28505 likes

https://www.facebook.com/imsaindia 46540 likes

https://www.facebook.com/imayoungdoctorswing 1681 likes

Twitter @IndianMedAssn 1027 followers

http://imahq.blogspot.com/ www.ima-ams.org

http://www.imacgpindia.com/

http://www.imacgponline.com/

http://www.ima-india.org/ima/

www.indianmedicalassociation.info
Reader Response
Dear Editor, I was pained to read of the demise of Pandit Vithal Rao Shivpurkar - the last court musician of the Nizam - in tragic circumstances. He got 'lost' in May end, at Shirdi after going there with his family for darshan, in the crowd. He was 86 years old. He was later found after 28 days in June end, but dead. I feel such incidents of 'losing' persons can very well be prevented by the simple use of Identity and Contact Detail tags on persons, who are known cases of Alzheimer's, diabetes, and children and other patients with ailments. The family has paid the price for not doing this, although he was a known case of Alzheimer’s for 10 years! Doctors should educate patients about this. It is also miraculous that just prior to death, he had a lucid interval in which he told his identity to an attendant, failing which he would not have been recognised. R I P: Dr Hemang D Koppikar
Media
IMA,IJCP,HCFI
IMA Videos
News on Maps